If There is No God: Atheism’s Moral Implications

If There is No God: Atheism’s Moral Implications

There was a time when I was so offended by the idea of God that I would literally take pleasure in rubbing my atheistic belief system in the faces of my evangelical family and friends. I took joy in dismantling their arguments for a Creator, and would boast in myself, “Finally, someone in this family has stopped following such nonsensical irrationality, and has shed off the binding chains of religion.” I was adamant in hailing religion’s ignorance, and at some points, even reasoned for it’s complete annihilation.

If you’re reading this now, you may be surprised that the man who currently takes such joy in reading, discussing, and writing about God’s Word was also the man that counted it as folly in the paragraph above.

That’s right folks; your brother in Christ used to be a fire breathing, religion berating atheist.

But, that same logically based mind that plunged me into a world of Nietzsche, Marx, and Dawkins, eventually led me straight to the foot of the cross on Calvary.

How?

Well, it all comes down to a little something called morality…


Do Atheists have Morals?

That subtitle was only meant to grab your attention. Of course atheists have morals.

That has never been the question. They hurt, they cry, they feel pain when they see someone they love in pain, and they are given over to random acts of kindness. Atheists care.

But, why?

Why do they care?

That’s the issue. You see, coming from an atheistic worldview leads to this progression in rationale:

  1. There is no God.
  2. I have morality.
  3. You have a different morality.
  4. Morals are relative to the individual, because there is no such thing as absolute truth or a divine law giver.
  5. Therefore, what’s right for you may not be right for me, and likewise.
  6. We must tolerate our differences in morality.

That looks fine doesn’t it?

Well, no actually.

If you come to the conclusion that morals are relative, you just created a logical hole big enough to drive a Mack truck through.

If morality is relative to the individual; murder, rape, child molestation, thievery, adultery, and every other act we consider heinous are ultimately up to personal conviction, and are therefore, not actually wrong for everyone.

Atheists must deal with that. When they go to bed at night, they must be willing to accept that if someone were to murder their loved one in their sleep, it isn’t wrong. How could it be? Wrong and right are categories that do no exist in reality. They are only constructions of the human mind.

When we take the secular atheistic worldview out to it’s furthest conclusions, we end up with absolute chaos. Don’t believe me?

Atheist and serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer said this:

“If a person doesn’t think that there is a God to be accountable to, then what’s the point of trying to modify your behavior to keep it within acceptable ranges?”

 

Disclaimer: I do not believe that atheists as a whole are anything like Dahmer. This quote was used to merely demonstrate his reasoning.

 

In addition, look at Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong, or Pol Pot, and the atrocities that were committed during their regimes.

We are talking about the taking of human life on a massive scale.

Sadly, in atheism, none of those atrocities are inherently wrong, because “right and wrong are illusions.”


That is why I cannot be an atheist.

Can you live with the moral implications of atheism?

In closing, hear the words of Christian apologist Ravi Zacharias,

I am thoroughly convinced that when the last chapter of humanity is written, we will find that the implications of atheism, i.e., living without God, if consistently carried through, will have made life plainly unlivable within the limits of reason or even common sense.”

Chris Beard is a lay minister, writer, and worship leader residing in Southwest Virginia. His passion is the study of God’s Word, and the preaching of the Gospel to all nations. He serves as a co-host and article contributor at Truth and Freedom Radio.

Comments

comments

4 Comments

  1. yes I agree with the saving power of Jesus Christ. However Buddhism has helped me with things like empathy and compassion. Also helped me with lust and desire for negative things not including sex. I know you will not agree with this statement but I think that if there was a way to incorporate Buddhist philosophy into a Christian study guide it would be really helpful. To me Buddhism is just a self help philosophy. I wish there was a way for everyone to come to know Christ. That’s why I started my Blogging site. so that way I can spread some sort of a message and still explain my life and my struggles as a growing Christian. It gets a lot easier as time goes on tho!

  2. I don’t think Buddhism is a good option for atheists. So, we disagree there brother.

    I disagree because, as a Christian, I believe that lack of belief in the saving work of Jesus Christ will ultimately end with that person in hell.

    If we truly believe the Bible, we have to share the Gospel. Jesus said that he is the way, the truth, and the life, and that no one comes to the Father except through him.

    To promote anything except the Gospel is tantamount to serving a death sentence to those who don’t know Christ, and I can’t do that in all good conscience.

  3. I really love this post. I heard somewhere that some atheist guy stated that morals where made just so the little guy could get a chance at life and not let the alpha males rule.

    Religion is needed to control the masses even if you are atheist. I feel Buddhism is a great option to a atheist. it more of a lifestyle value system to achieve personal enlightenment. I love Buddhism even tho I am a Christian. Weird huh!?

  4. Excellent! Keep writing!

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